Books you may be interested in - click through for reviews and to read 1st chapter free. If you purchase, a portion will go to support this web site but it won't cost you extra.

Daniel Walker Howe is a fine social historian and historian of ideas.
  From the end of the War of 1812 through the first railroads and telegraphs, the Mexican-American War which shifted America's center of gravity  to the slaveowning south.  Meanwhile, evangelism, temperance (anti-alcohol) and anti-slavery movements stirred up the country.

If you haven't read it yet, maybe now is a good time, and guess what, it's a best-seller which means Amazon is discounting it big.  Accept no substitutes (esp. from anybody named Beck).

Sources Used In
Tales of the Early Republic
Books by Authors: 'A...'

(or titles: 'A...', if no author is given)

For Copyright Notice, see end of text.

Part of the Tales of the Early Republic Web Project


Abbott, Jacob, The Cornerstone (Boston, Wm. Peirce, 1834)

Inspirational book. Excerpted in Jacksonian Miscellanies #70 (9/22/98).

Books by Jacob Abbott on Amazon (dozens of titles)


Abdy, Edward S., Journal of a Residence and Tour in the United States (3 vols, London, 1835)

Quoted extensively in Gentlemen of Prop..., as a rare true sympathiser with free blacks in the U.S. He is apparently one of the best observers of the many anti-black and anti-abolitionist riots of the Jackson era. He also thought the solution to the American race problem was a thorough mingling of the races - what others would call "mulatization", "amalgamation", or "miscegeny".

A reprint was made in the 60s or 70s by Negro University Press (or something like that).

This is a pretty rare book, and I have only seen it cited by Gentlemen of Prop...


Abel, Annie Heloise; Klingberg, Frank J. (eds), A Side-Light on Anglo-American Relations 1839-58, Furnished by the Correspondence of Lewis Tappan and Others with The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, (New York, A. M. Kelley, 1970)

Editions of this work and related works on Amazon (way more than you'd expect).


Adams, John Quincy; Adams, Charles Francis, ed., Memoirs of John Quincy Adams, Comprising Portions of His Diary from 1795 to 1848 (Philadelphia, 1875-1877; Reprint: New York, AMS Press)



Alexander, De Alva S., A Political History of the State of New York. 2 vols. New York: Henry Holt and Co. 1906.

Alford, Terry, Prince Among Slaves, The True Story of an African Prince Sold Into Slavery in the American South (Oxford U. Press, 1977).




Ames, Fisher, Works of Fisher Ames, (Boston 1809)

Cited in Gilje, Road to Mobocracy, p3, 5, incl. quote on p3 "A mobocracy ... is .. a Cerberus gaping with ten thousand throats ... those who, after the calamity, would reconstruct ... pulick liberty, will be scarcely able to find the model of the artificers, or even the ruins."


Andrews, Alexander, The History of British Journalism, from the Foundation of the Newspaper Press in England to the Repeal of the Stamp Act in 1855 (Grosse Pointe, MI: Scholarly Press; Orig: London: Richard Bentley, 1859).


Andrews, William L. (ed, intro),
Sisters of the spirit : Three Black Women's Autobiographies of the Nineteenth Century
(Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1986.)

NYPL:  Sc E 86-333

Contains a reprint of
Foote, Julia A. J., A Brand Plucked From the Fire: An Autobiographical Sketch (Cleveland, Ohio, Printed for the author by Lauer & Yost, 1879, and Lauer & Yost as publisher in 1886).

Also biographies of Jarena Lee and Zilpha Elaw


Annals of America, published by Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc (citations from 1979 printing):

A very accessible set of 20+ books organized by period, containing nothing but period materials, with a few explanatory comments. Its virtue is that it gives a pretty good sampling of newspaper articles, speeches, pamphlets, etc., and it should be found in any decent library (and can often be found cheaply in used book stores).


Atwater, Caleb, Remarks Made on a Tour to Prairie du Chein, thence to Washington City in 1829 (orig: Columbus, OH, 1831; New York, Arno Press reprint, 1975).


Atwater, Caleb, Remarks Made on a Tour to Prairie du Chien (1831)

Lively account of towns on the Ohio and Mississippi, bargaining with Indians and observing their ceremonies and culture, and crossing endless wildernesses. Also, in the later chapters, of society in Philadephia and Washington, DC, where he went to make a report to the Senate, at the beginning of 1830 (a key point in the Nullification controversy; he was there during the Haine-Webster debate, and though he said at most little about the debate itself, he aimed a lot of barbed remarks at the nullifiers). A recent reprint exists (de Capa?).



Copyright 1998 by Hal Morris, Secaucus, NJ

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